Posts by Aimee Byrd

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What do goats and coffee have in common? Well as the folktale goes, an Ethiopian named Kaldi did not understand why his goats were playing and dancing so joyously one day, paying him no mind. As it turned out, they had been nibbling on some berries from what we now know to be coffee trees...
Women are very good doers. We write lists, multi-task, and get things done. God created women to be helpers and has equipped us with much strength to do so. However, today I want to propose that maybe our best gifts are a bit more inert. There are many things that we cannot do, and should not do...
The Gospel Commission, by Michael Horton (Baker Books, 2011) I am only fifty pages into Horton’s new, new book and have found many gems. This section summarizes something I’m passionate about: We are God’s Analogy, created in his image to reflect in our own creaturely manner that covenantal...
Last Friday, I went out to dinner with my mom, sister, sister-in-law, and friend Cory. We were celebrating the spring birthdays of my sisters and Cory. As we were chatting it up, a lady was soliciting diners to buy roses from her pre-packaged stash. My mother obliged, and treated us each to a rose...
I like fun words. I love learning new words or rediscovering old ones to use in my vocabulary. So every Wednesday I will be posting a new word of the week, along with its definition. I challenge you to use it in conversation throughout the week so that it can sink into your normal rhetoric. It...
Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?, by Dr. Seuss The Byrdhouse loves Dr. Seuss. As I was tucking my 6-year-old son into bed last night, I read him this book. We giggled at all of the different sorts of people Dr. Seuss reminds us to be lucky we’re not. For example, P oor Ali Sard has to mow...
I’m not the best small-talker. For me, the function of small talk is a warm-up for deeper conversation. I’m comfortable with that. First you have to serve the ping-pong ball back and forth a couple of times before settling on a shared topic of interest. But these days, small talk has become the so-...
The Prodigal God , by Timothy Keller (Dutton, 2008) When it comes to identifying idols and applying the gospel, Keller is so convicting for me. This book goes through the parable of the prodigal son, showing the idolatry of self-righteousness in the older son, and the Father as the One who has...
On our way to church last week, we stopped behind a car with this bumper-sticker: God recycles. He made man out of the dust. Really? That’s our witness? A cheesy idiom that will win over the environmentalists? Will it? Maybe they were environmentalist, chastising wastefulness. If this was the case...
I like fun words. I love learning new words or rediscovering old ones to use in my vocabulary. So every Wednesday I will be posting a new word of the week, along with its definition. I challenge you to use it in conversation throughout the week so that it can sink into your normal rhetoric. It...
Marriage To a Difficult Man , by Elisabeth D. Dodds (Audubon Press, 2004) My husband was a bit troubled when my friend, Dana, gave me this book along with Journey to Hell for my 30 th birthday. Despite the tricky title, this book recounts the wonderful marriage of Sarah and Jonathan Edwards. I love...
On my Confessions page, I mentioned that I finally broke down and joined Facebook at the same time I started my blog. It seemed pretty necessary for sharing my articles with friends and hoping they would share with their other friends. Also, the whole like button was such a mystery to me, but was...
This is a book that I was eager to read. I’ve had a very critical attitude about where technology is going, and how it is shaping us before I curmudgeonly surrendered to blogging and all (well, really only some of) its associated networking. Now that I confess to its necessities and benefits, I...
I like fun words. I love learning new words or rediscovering old ones to use in my vocabulary. So every Wednesday I will be posting a new word of the week, along with its definition. I challenge you to use it in conversation throughout the week so that it can sink into your normal rhetoric. It...
According to the American College of Sports Medicine, approximately 60% of well-meaning people who begin a workout routine give up. And then there’s a small percentage out of the 40% left, who encounter overtraining syndrome. Martha Pyron, Md., wrote an article about it for ACSM’s quarterly...
Girls Gone Wise , by Mary A. Kassian (Moody, 2010) Pre-Fall nakedness symbolized the purity and innocence of humans before God. Post-Fall nakedness symbolizes the inability of humans to make themselves presentable before Him. God did what Adam and Eve were unable to do. He covered them and made...
I seriously got back into a regular workout routine about two years ago. Having been raised in a family that values physical fitness, I have always lived a somewhat active life. However, in my thirties it became apparent that my body was not as obliging to my requests. It was time to get a little...
I like fun words. I love learning new words or rediscovering old ones to use in my vocabulary. So every Wednesday I will be posting a new word of the week, along with its definition. I challenge you to use it in conversation throughout the week so that it can sink into your normal rhetoric. It...
Finally, I get to enjoy my first “real” spring morning of the year. A couple of weeks ago, I thought spring was ushered in. We saw daffodils and other early spring blooms. The robins have appeared. I quickly ordered new flip-flops and shorts for the kids. Baseball practices began. We were given...
In my last article, I considered the fitness of Christ in His ability to bear the cross with patient endurance, along with how we are exhorted in Hebrews 12:1 to run the race set before us with endurance. The Christian life requires fitness. At the end of the race, I want to be proved qualified...
The Evil of Evils , by Jeremiah Burroughs (Soli Deo Gloria, 1992 [first published 1654]) Oh, you heavens! How could you behold such a spectacle as this was? How was the earth able to bear it? Truly, neither heaven nor earth was able, for the Scripture says that the sun withdrew its light and was...
We are currently studying the doctrine of Christ in my Sunday School class. I’ve been reflecting for a couple of weeks now about one of our homework questions. The text: Therefore we also, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which so...
Since it's Holy Week, I thought it would be good to use a related theological term for our Word of the Week. This definition comes from Michael Horton's The Christian Faith : Penal Substitution : Jesus Christ's sacrifice was the payment of a debt to divine justice as a substitute for his people...
Spurgeon’s Sermons, Vol. 1&2, Christ Crucified , Charles Haddon Spurgeon (Baker Books, second printing, 1999) I confess I have a shelf in my head for everything now. Whatever I read I know where to put it; whatever I learn I know where to stow it away. Once when I read books, I put all my...
[caption id="attachment_124" align="alignleft" width="225" caption="Is coffee talk on the endangered list?"] [/caption] Have you ever received a picture of a cup of coffee, or cocktail on your Facebook page? Yesterday I was sent a virtual fortune cookie to open. I know that I have been guilty of...
The Next Story , by Tim Challies (Zondervan, 2011) The subtitle of this book is Life and Faith after the Digital Explosion . In my new experiences as a blogger (freshman, to say the least) I have had many thoughts on this very topic. My next post will be an article I wrote a couple of weeks ago on...
Schadenfreude: (shäd’n-froi’də) a compound German word (lit. “damage-joy"). It refers to malicious joy in the misfortunes of others . From “schaden”– damage, harm, injury + “freude”– joy. This week's word was provided to us by Steve Cornell. Check out his post on Social Cannibalism: http://...
I can hardly bear the tattling any longer. The second I correct one of my children, they try to nail their brother or sister for a related offense. It is wearing me down. Why do my children want to throw each other under the bus so callously? They take no thought of how ugly they’re revealing...
Dual Citizens , by Jason J. Stellman (Reformation Trust, 2009) Whether we are beholding the majesty of Mount Rainier, rejoicing over the birth of our first child, or simply savoring a good pale ale or single malt Scotch, a world-affirming Christianity does more justice to both the incarnation of...
My neighbor, John, has a wonderful vegetable garden. When we first built our home, I perceived his gi-normous patch of tilled dirt facing my backyard as a bit of an eyesore. I seriously considered planting a row of trees to block my view. However, I bore in mind that the trees wouldn’t only block...
Rescuing Ambition , by Dave Harvey (Crossway, 2010) In this book, Harvey encourages godly Ambition, and contrasts it with selfish ambition. You can view the website for his book at www.rescuingambition.com . There were many great sections on which to reflect but this one speaks particularly to my...
I like fun words. I love learning new words or rediscovering old ones to use in my vocabulary. So every Wednesday I will be posting a new word of the week, along with its definition. I challenge you to use it in conversation throughout the week so that it can sink into your normal rhetoric. It...
Share , send , publish , post —these are familiar buttons that our fingers push to communicate now days. Being rather inexperienced in the world of submissions for publication, I have a particular anxiety with the send and publish buttons. In fact, I have only made three submissions so far. The...
The Gospel-Driven Life , by Michael Horton (Baker Books, 2009) Our fear of God must become greater than our fear of boredom. Making disciples, like making crafts, great works of art, fine wine, a memorable dinner, and raising children, takes a long time. It is like watching corn grow and that’s...
Have you ever heard the traveling advice that if there is an airplane emergency, the mother needs to make sure that she puts her oxygen mask on first, or she will be of no good use for saving her children? We are constantly used to putting our children’s needs before our own, so I can see why this...
I like fun words. I love learning new words or rediscovering old ones to use in my vocabulary. So every Wednesday I will be posting a new word of the week, along with its definition. I challenge you to use it in conversation throughout the week so that it can sink into your normal rhetoric. It...
The Weight of Glory , by C.S. Lewis There could be several entries of reflection made from this essay (and there very well may be), but for today: Our Lord finds our desires not too strong but too weak. (p.26) How often do we get caught up in the pursuit of happiness, only to realize that we are...
My middle child, Zaidee, had her ninth birthday recently. Of course you want your child to feel special and loved on their birthday. She started her morning opening presents and then it was off to school to be the celebrity of the day. I blessed her with my presence at lunch, where she discovered...
Amusing Ourselves to Death , by Neil Postman: So I finally get around to reading Postman’s great book and on p. 68 I’m challenged with the question: How often does it occur that information provided you on a morning radio or television, or in the morning newspaper, caused you to alter your plans...
I remember when my fifth grade art teacher announced, much to my horror, that we were now too old to be drawing every picture with the sun (burst) in the upper left corner of the page. What? That was how I began every picture! It was like the schoolgirl’s way of spreading happy onto whatever theme...
Join me in learning more about God and examining whether our knowledge of Him is congruent with our thinking and everyday living.