Wesley

Lee Gatiss
In one of my former posts on the darker side of predestination , I quoted the great Anglican scholar J.B. Mozley. He said, "There is no real distinction between abandoning men to a certain state, of which punishment will be the consequence, and ordaining them to that punishment." I must say, I have...
Lee Gatiss
Augustus Toplady once said that "it is not necessary to be timid in order to be meek." And I guess that must be right, glancing at the inspired examples in Galatians 5:12 or Matthew 23:1-33. It needs to be seen in proper context though. Toplady thought it was the most fitting response to what had...
Lee Gatiss
In my former forays into the dangerous territory of saying anything negative about the great and famous John Wesley, I foolishly mentioned his unusually positive views of the arch-heretic Pelagius ("Who was Pelagius? By all I can pick up from ancient authors, I guess he was both a wise and a holy...
Lee Gatiss
I must thank Professor McCall for his full and hearty (c.2000 word) response to what he (presumably ironically) calls my "essay" (a 500 word blogpost) on Wesley and Pelagius . Mark Jones has urged me to be brief, so even though I have lots of questions about what my learned interlocutor has written...
Thomas H. McCall
I. Introduction I have always found Lee Gatiss to be a fine historian, so I was disappointed to see his claims in the recent " Wesley and Pelagius ". He points out that Pelagius has been universally reviled and rejected in orthodox (Western) Christian theology, and then he also points out that John...
Lee Gatiss
For century after century, one man has been the bogeyman of Western theology. He's the bad guy. The one nobody wants to be like. Yes, you guessed it: that old Welsh heretic, Pelagius . For centuries the malign influence of his worksy free will religion has been resisted. Bede narrates in his...