Lord’s Supper

Right Reception of the Lord’s Supper T he Lord’s Supper was to be taken seriously, after much preparation, careful self-examination, and Christ-centered participation. Edwards wrote, “’Tis the most solemn confirmation that can be conceived of.... It is more solemn than a mere oath.” [1] He later...
Qualifications for Admission to the Lord’s Supper G iven the awesome potential of communion with Christ within the Supper, the Puritans took the matter of right participation seriously. The awakened conscience cannot consider partaking of such a sacred meal without asking, “What does God require of...
Biblical Simplicity in the Lord’s Supper I f the material principle of the Reformation was justification by faith alone, the formal principle was that Scripture alone is the rule of faith and obedience. The Puritans viewed this truth as nothing less than the enthronement of Christ as King among His...
T he Thirty-nine Articles continue its narrative as it sets out a biblically faithful theology of God’s ordained means of grace in the sacraments. As we have seen in our study of other essential doctrines, the article begins with the general principles of the doctrine before continuing to a more...
Christ’s Presence in the Lord’s Supper “O ne reason why we so little value the ordinance [of the Lord’s Supper], and profit so little by it, may be because we understand so little of the nature of that special communion with Christ which we have therein,” wrote John Owen. [1] It's the nature of...
Papal Errors in the Lord’s Supper T he Puritans viewed transubstantiation as “repugnant, not to Scripture alone, but even to common sense and reason.” [1] John Owen (1616–1683) wrote, “This is one of the greatest mysteries of the Roman magic and juggling, that corporeal elements should have a power...
Introduction T he Lord’s Supper is an earthly encounter with the heavenly Christ, said the Puritans. In this they agreed with the teaching of John Calvin (1509–1564). [1] John Knox (c. 1505–1572), the link between Calvin and British Puritanism, [2] wrote that just as Christ said “he himself was the...
One of the more visible repercussions of the Protestant Reformation was a reconfiguration of the furniture found within local churches. Throughout the Medieval period it was the Table of the Eucharist that sat center-stage, the literal and liturgical focal point of the Roman Catholic Mass. It was...
This week on Theology on the Go, our host, Dr. Jonathan Master is joined by Dr. Barry York. Since 2013, Dr. York has been professor of pastoral theology and Dean of Faculty at the Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Pittsburgh. However, before serving the seminary, Dr. York was sent to...
For John Calvin, worship was central to life - it is why man exists. Worship was also central to his understanding of the Reformation, for he believed that the church’s return to true worship was the flowering fruit of all that was being done in his time. Other than the preaching of God’s word, it...