John Owen

Bill Boekestein
Part 1 Specific Directions for Mortification Identify the Symptoms that Accompany a Lust If the symptoms are deadly, the sin must be killed by special measures lest our lives end in hellish tragedy. A sin is deadly if it has become an established habit. When sin becomes rooted in our daily routines...
Bill Boekestein
I n 1656 Puritan Pastor John Owen felt concerned that professing Christians were too “at peace in the world” (vii). He also believed that much of the teaching against sin in his day produced “superstition, self-righteousness and anxiety of conscience” in the hearers (viii). So, Owen wrote a little...
Exuberant over an experience, an oh-so-sweet manifestation of divine providence, you delightedly seek to give God praise in telling your story. “It was such a ‘God thing’,” you proclaim. As you see it, God wove together an otherwise inexplicable combination of events to deliver a wonderful—even...
W hen one surveys the ever-growing secondary literature on John Owen (1616–1683) the conclusion that can be legitimately drawn is that worship or liturgical theology was just not a major concern for him. Our own Ryan McGraw did his PhD on Owen's view of worship as communion with the Triune God and...
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After a cracking day at the Evangelical Library in London on "Reading John Owen" (opening, it has to be said, with Nigel Graham giving what may be one of the finest popular introductions to the life of Owen that it has been my privilege to hear - lively, careful, engaging, insightful), I want to do...
Rick Phillips
In a remarkable scene at the end of David's life, the sweet singer of Israel reflects on his life and his hope for the future. We can well understand that David would be concerned for the future well-being of his line. But he looks with confidence on the assurance of God's covenant: "For does not...
Lee Gatiss
Having previously proved without any shadow of a doubt that the great John Owen was not a Baptist , no, definitely not a Baptist , and certainly not a Presbyterian , it is important that we now go one step further. In this year when we celebrate his 400th birthday, it is important that we recognise...
Lee Gatiss
In the last month or two on Reformation21, I think it's safe to say I have decisively proven once and for all that: 1. John Wesley was an Arminian. 2. John Owen was a Paedobaptist. I have been challenged to prove other self-evident truths, such as "John Murray was a Calvinist" and "1775 was the...
Lee Gatiss
Well, if I thought it was bad when I exposed a few less-well-known things about John Wesley , that's nothing compared to what happens when you touch the sacred shibboleths of Owenian Baptists! There was a bit of a social media frenzy about my post yesterday concerning John Owen's covenant theology...