Results tagged “Banner of Truth” from Reformation21 Blog

Banner of Truth kindling

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banner of truth.jpgThe Banner of Truth is entering the sphere of the digital reader! A first ten volumes have been released as ebooks, combining a mix of classics with more modern treatments. Among the ancients you will find Bunyan, Owen, Spurgeon and Brown. More modern volumes include Edward Donnelly's outstanding Peter: Eyewitness of His Majesty (the sections on Peter as a preacher and pastor make this an under-the-radar gem of pastoral theology), as well as books by Ian Hamilton and Garry Williams. Fans of The Valley of Vision will be delighted to learn that this volume is also among the first tranche of offerings. All of these are available as mobi and epub files. Order options allow buyers to obtain hard copies and electronic versions in a single bundle, a nice touch for those of us who don't want to lose our 'real' books.

We are promised that further e-volumes will be rolling off the presses in fairly substantial chunks, so keep an eye on the catalogue. Banner ebooks to date can all be found here (or go here and browse ebooks).

Around and about (with Lloyd-Jones and Spurgeon)

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I managed to sneak in a few hours at the Banner of Truth Ministers Conference in Leicester last week. I was unable to stay for more than a day, but heard a sweet sermon from Andrew Davies, what was for me a somewhat ungrounded disquisition on sin by the very engaging David Meredith, and a thought-provoking meditation from Garry Williams on the reforming church and what he labelled "false conservatism." I should point out that the latter two were probably not asked to deliver sermons, but the Banner could do with more preaching at these conferences. As usual, it was a particular pleasure to meet several old friends, and some newer ones.

One distinctive feature of my time away was the pleasure of meeting the film crew who are working on a documentary about the life and legacy of Lloyd-Jones, Logic on Fire. Matthew Robinson and Jon Yerby, two of the brothers working on the film, dropped by the church which I serve on the previous Lord's day and spend the day with us, which was a delight. A number of the great and the good (and one or two others!) had the opportunity to speak about the impact of Lloyd-Jones' on their own lives and labours. I look forward to seeing the finished product, and will pass on details when it is available.

Another pleasure was meeting Stephen McCaskell, a Patheos blogger and collator of the quotes in the book Through the Eyes of C. H. Spurgeon (Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk). He is working hard on a film that will take us on a guided tour of the life of this servant of God: Through the Eyes of Spurgeon. I am eager to see what Stephen will produce, and it looks as if I may have some involvement, which will be fun. I hope to let you know how the project progresses. In the meantime, anyone eager to help out can make a donation.

The Banner of Truth Conference

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Friends in the UK and mainland Europe might be interested to know of the Banner of Truth Conference at Leicester, due to take place this year on Monday 15 through Thursday 18 April. Speakers include Sinclair Ferguson, who probably needs no introduction, Warren Peel, a dear friend from the Reformed Presbyterian Church in Northern Ireland, and a fine scholar and preacher, and Mike Reeves, combining light and heat as head of theology at UCCF.

Details are available here for those who wish to know more.

The Banner of Truth Conference

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I returned home yesterday from the Banner of Truth Ministers' Conference held in Leicester in the UK. This was the fiftieth anniversary of its founding, though not quite the fiftieth conference (they missed maybe one or two for various reasons over the years). We heard Ted Donnelly (briefly but beautifully, as the after-effects of his recent illness made themselves known in the act of his preaching, though he still was enabled to establish a keynote for the conference); Maurice Roberts on the holiness of God; Matthew Brennan from Clonmel, Ireland, on John the Baptist and Jesus the Christ; Lewis Allen chaired a discussion on preachers and preaching; Jonathan Watson offered some deeply felt and plainly telt lessons from Old Princeton; Iain Murray gave an impromptu address on the benefits and dangers of controversy; and, Alistair Begg opened up the book of Titus. The times of prayer were well-attended, the opportunities for fellowship sweet, the singing of psalms and hymns splendid, the games of football intense.

Next year's Ministers' Conference is due to be held in Leicester from Monday 15th through Thursday 18th April (the Youth Conference precedes it, being held over the previous weekend, Friday 12th through Sunday 14th April). I do not know too much about the Youth Conference at this time, but the big cheese at the Ministers' Conference will be Sinclair Ferguson, a man who probably needs no introduction to readers of this blog. Other speakers include a dear friend of mine, Warren Peel, pastor of Ballyclabber Reformed Presbyterian Church (just outside Coleraine in Northern Ireland), a man who combines brilliance of mind with warmth of heart; Mike Reeves, Head of Theology at UCCF and author of several helpful volumes of basic theology and history); and, Jonathan Watson, general editor at the Banner of Truth Trust, who usually offers some insightful introduction to a recent substantial addition to the Banner oeuvre. It promises to be a good'un.

If you are a pastor, might I encourage you to think about attending (and perhaps pointing your young people toward the youth conference)? As Alistair Begg pointed out, there is a peculiar Britishness to the conference in some respects, a sort of determined, bloody-minded straightforwardness, in which the men usually surrounded by lackeys at other major conferences, with the plebs kept at pole's length, are at Leicester to be found sitting round tables late at night being plied with questions, while a bag of fruit pastilles (other late-night conversation sustaining confectionery is available) is passed around to help maintain the feast of reason and the flow of soul.