Christ in all the Scriptures and Jesus on every page

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I was grateful to be offered an early glimpse of David Murray's latest book, Jesus On Every Page (Thomas Nelson, 2013) (see below for a giveaway and special launch offer). It did not disappoint.

Imagine, if you will, an art gallery devoted to portraits of one particular person by one particular artist. A significant part of it is well-illuminated, clearly open to the public, and the beauty of its displays is fairly readily evident. However, there are substantial portions of the gallery which, though belonging to the whole, showing works by the same artist and portraits of the same subject, and contributing to the whole effect, are being overlooked. Over time, it has been suggested that the early works of the artist are perhaps not his best efforts, and do not show his subject to best effect, if indeed that subject is properly discernible. Such discouragements led to visitors being steered away from that part. Experts, some of them well-meaning, set up barriers to keep the plebs away. When the bulbs went out, no-one bothered replacing them; when rooms fell into disrepair, no one worked to restore them. Over time more than half of the gallery, with the exception of a few well-maintained and often-visited spots here and there, became shrouded in dust and cobwebs, entered only by an intrepid few, peering through the gloom at dimly-seen and barely-appreciated works of art.

Such is the Old Testament to many readers of the Bible, even those who are persuaded in principle that the whole of the book and all its books declare the Lord Christ in some way. I remember hearing of a Westminster Seminary professor who would examine the Bibles of his students, assessing the wear of the gold leaf on the edges of the pages to see if they had been neglecting to read and to study their Old Testaments, and who was often moved to deliver something of a reproof to his acolytes.

But what if some determined soul made it his project to expose the grandeur of that overlooked portion of the gallery, persuaded that the artist was no less skilful in his early phase than in his latter, but rather had deliberately developed a technique over time, making plain his intentions by degrees, and that the subject of his works was of such excellence and beauty that the merest glimpses of his person were worthy of attention? That determined soul begins to move aside the barriers, sweep away the cobwebs, clean the windows, relay the wiring, replace the bulbs, and so brings the neglected rooms and their works back into public view. In certain rooms, in order to emphasize the necessity and profit of his work and to reinforce its value, he sets up special displays to bring into particular prominence certain aspects of the artist's work in highlighting his subject.

That is David Murray's intention in this book. He leaves all the apparatus of his restoration work well out of sight, allowing us simply to enjoy its fruits. After a brief survey of the problem and how it is addressed by our Lord himself and three of the most significant New Testament authors, he sets out to give us "spiritual heartburn" by reviewing (in the style to which he has made us accustomed) Christ's planet, people, presence, precepts, past, prophets, pictures, promises, proverbs and poets, well realising his aim to give us a properly popular and accessible introduction to the topic. Indeed, as the reader works through the book, there will be moments in which you particularly appreciate the precise way in which he has angled the lighting, even as you gape in delight at the portraits which, so lit, reveal something of the beauty and majesty of the Lord Jesus. Perhaps best of all, preachers will, I hope, see a range of exciting possibilities open up at the prospect of giving their own guided tours of the Old Testament.

To be sure, some will have their own particular works that they might like to have seen featured, and different approaches or nuances in the matter of covenant theology in particular might move some to suggest a different arrangement of that particular display, but the point of the whole is to re-introduce us to the riches of the Old Testament and to begin equipping us to delve beyond the masterpieces that the author has brought to immediate prominence. It is appetite-whetting stuff.

So may I encourage you to take David Murray's Emmaus Tour of the Old Testament? I am sure it will richly repay your investment, pointing you in the right direction to begin exploring the Redeemer's person and work as you discover Christ in all the Scriptures and Jesus On Every Page.

* * * * * * *

You can order David's book through the usual sources (for example, Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk) or direct from the publisher. The book has its own website (JesusOnEveryPage.com), and there is also a very generous launch offer of $100 worth of Old Testament resources.

In addition, I have two copies of the book to give away, but - naturally - not without a little effort. So, the first two people to track me down on Twitter @peregrinus75 and tell me (#EveryPage, if possible) which Old Testament portrait of Christ they most appreciate and - if there is space - why, will get a free copy. Others will earn gratitude and appreciation.
Posted August 20, 2013 @ 4:59 AM by Jeremy Walker
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