November 2012 Archives

Thank God that Christians Are Not Totally Depraved

Article by   November 2012
One of the most pressing concerns in Reformed churches today is the importance of getting the gospel right. Recently, Reformed churches have had to oppose the Federal Vision theology, which compromises justification by inserting good works into the definition of faith. Unfortunately, Christians tend to defend doctrines by erring in the opposite direction. So it is that Reformed churches are presently facing a corruption of the gospel by the virtual denial of sanctification and good works. continue

T-t-t-talkin' Bout My Generation (But Thinking About the One After Next)

Article by   November 2012
The Greek historian Herodotus tells the story of an encounter between Croesus, the fantastically wealthy king of Lydia, and the Athenian sage and lawmaker, Solon. Pointing to his wealth and power, Croesus asked Solon if he considered him to be blessed. Solon's laconic response was simple: 'Count no man blessed until he is dead.' Years later, having been stripped of his earthly power and wealth by the Persians, Solon's words came back to haunt the former monarch with something of a vengeance. continue

The Two Kingdoms Doctrine, Part Three: The Teaching of Scripture

Article by   November 2012
The fundamental biblical truth that is expressed in the two kingdoms doctrine is that the Christian's hope is to be fixed not on the things of this life that we see and experience all around us - our families, our work, politics - but on the Lord Jesus Christ, in whom we are promised a kingdom that will transform and transcend all of these things. This conviction, in turn, arises out of Christ's teaching in the Sermon on the Mount that though believers' lives are often characterized by poverty, mourning, an unsatisfied hunger and thirst for justice, and humiliating persecution, they are nevertheless said to possess the "kingdom of heaven," a kingdom in which they will be comforted, satisfied, and granted the inheritance of the earth (Matthew 5:1-12). It expresses Jesus's command to his disciples to pray that God's kingdom would come and his will be done, for even as the things of this earth are destroyed or lost, Christians must live so as to store up treasures in heaven, where nothing is destroyed or lost (Matthew 5:10, 19-21). It seeks to take seriously Jesus' exhortation to his disciples not to worry about the matters of this life, the things after which the nations seek. It is not that they are unimportant, but that if believers seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness "all these things will be added to you" (Matthew 5:25-33). continue

The Eternal, Inextricable Link

Article by   November 2012
One of the questions that came to me asked about the nature of the antithesis and its relationship to evangelicalism. This may initially sound like an abstract, maybe even, impractical, question. But it could be one of the most important questions that is asked with respect to apologetics. Reformed theology has rightly placed significant emphasis on the theological notion of "Covenant." When God determined to relate himself to creation, and to bind himself accordingly, that determination and binding established a covenant relationship between God and creation, and specifically between God and man (male and female), as image of God. continue

Five Christian Responses to the 2012 Election

Article by   November 2012
As conservative Christians, the recent national elections in America should not bring alarm merely because of the anticipated results of economic policies or concerns for the safety of our nation in a dangerous world. Economic and foreign policy matters are those in which sincere Christians can and do disagree without violence to the Bible. It is clear from the election that our nation is greatly divided on how to proceed with the economy and foreign policy, so Christians should continue to pray for God's wisdom to guide elected leaders and to bless well-intended measures that may be adopted. continue

Our Southern Zion: Old Columbia Seminary, 1828-1927

Article by   November 2012
David B. Calhoun, Our Southern Zion: Old Columbia Seminary, 1828-1927, Banner of Truth, 2012, 380 pages, cloth, illustrated, and index.The city of Columbia was created the capital of South Carolina by the state legislature in 1786.  It was intentionally located... continue

Vatican Files no.15

Article by   November 2012
The Synod for the New Evangelization can be thought of as "a master of a house, who brings out of his treasure what is new and what is old" (Matthew 13:52, ESV). Jesus's explanation of the parable of the net is a useful starting point to come to terms with what happened at the Synod that just ended (28 October 2012). After weeks of intensive discussions, its final act was the drafting of a list of 58 propositions (i.e. points worthy of attention) that were presented to the Pope for his consideration in the future promulgation of a papal document (Apostolic Exhortation) that will become part of the Magisterium of the Church. The shape of the New Evangelization (NE) is becoming more and more clear, at least on paper, while it remains to be seen what practical outcomes will result from it. The achievements of the Synod as reflected by these propositions are a mixture of new and old things that call for discernment in order to not concentrate on a few selected items alone. continue
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